Which 2021 Toyota Hilux should I buy? [Comparison Guide]

Updated Jan 22, 2021 | Same topic: Which Car Variant to Buy?

Out of the Hilux’s 13 variants, which suits you the best?

For a good while now, the Toyota Hilux has been one of the most dominant models in the local pickup truck segment. It has more than proven itself to be a reliable workhorse, a great daily family ride, and even as a fun off-roader.

2021 Toyota Hilux Philippines Quick Look: Subtle changes that matter

To capitalize on its success, Toyota Motor Philippines have introduced a lot of variants to the local market, 13 to be exact. From the point of view of the consumer, this is a huge advantage as it provides them with a lot of choices. For some inexperienced buyers however, this might make their head spin.

To help you choose the perfect Toyota Hilux for you, here’s a short but concise guide on how the variants differ from one another.

A picture of the Toyota Hilux

Versatility is a pickup truck's greatest strength

Toyota Hilux Variants: Exterior

When it comes to exteriors, the best-looking Hilux trim is the Conquest. It rides on a set of 18-inch gloss black alloy wheels that are wrapped in 265/60 tires.

The front end also looks different from the rest of the variant lineup thanks to its imposing-looking “three-dimensional grille.” Its sides are also clad with hefty looking overfenders, side decals, as well as a beefy-looking step board.

A picture of the Hilux Conquest

The intimidating Hilux Conquest

The Hilux Conquest is also the best when it comes to exterior features. It comes standard with Bi-beam LED headlamps with auto-leveling, and LED daytime running lamps. The rear also gets LED taillamps, a bedliner, and a sleek-looking sports bar.

The rear of the Toyota Hilux Conquest

The rear of the Toyota Hilux Conquest

As for the other variants, the Hilux G and the Hilux E are a bit simpler looking. Both do have the more aggressive new front-end, albeit a bit subtler. Both, however, lack a bedliner, overfenders, and a step board, features that are available to the top-spec variant. In addition, they both come with multi-reflector halogen headlamps instead of LEDs. Both also come standard with a simpler-looking bulb type rear taillight, but they do have an LED front fog lamp just like the Conquest.

One thing that differentiates the G and the E trims is that the latter rides on 17-inch steel wheels, while the former uses a 17-inch alloy wheel set.

A picture of the Toyota Hilux G

The simpler, but still macho Toyota Hilux G

Toyota Hilux Variants: Interior and onboard tech

As with the exterior, the Hilux E and G are the simplest. They both lack the eight-inch display audio infotainment system found on the Conquest and instead they have a smaller 6.75-inch unit. Both headunits however come with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, Smart Device Link, and Miracast. Both are also capable of playing AM/FM radio, and both also have Bluetooth and USB connectivity. Strangely enough, only the smaller headunit comes with an aux-jack. The Conquest trims, the G, as well as the E comes standard with a six-piece speaker system.

As for seating, the Conquest, G, and E are equipped with a six-way manually adjustable driver’s seat and a four-way manually adjustable front passenger seat. The rear of the E however does not have the 60:40 split available on the Conquest and the G. Of note, only the Conquest trim level comes with leather seats and a leather-wrapped steering wheel.

A picture of the interior of the Hilux Conquest

The cockpit of the Toyota Hilux Conquest

The G and the E in comparison come with fabric seats and the Hilux E has a steering wheel made out of urethane. And lastly, in terms of seating, the rear of the Hilux E only has two bottle holders, whereas the G has cupholders and bottle holders. All Hilux variants do come with four cup holders and two bottle holders for the front.

For driver amenities, all non-fleet Hilux variants are equipped with a 4.2-inch multi-information display, a multi-function steering wheel with voice command, as well as audio and phone controls. All non-fleet variants, however, do come standard with power-adjustable and power-folding side mirrors. The Hilux also has cruise control but it’s only available on the Conquest variants.

>>> Related: 2021 Toyota Hilux Old vs New: Spot the differences

Toyota Hilux Variants: Engine and performance

The non-fleet Toyota Hilux currently available in the Philippines has two engine options. The most powerful one is the 1GD-FTV inline-4 turbo diesel engine, and it is available only on the Hilux Conquest 2.8 4x4 AT and the Hilux Conquest 2.8 4x4 MT. On the 2.8-liter AT, it can produce up to 201 horsepower and 500 Nm of torque. Meanwhile, the 2.8-liter with the manual tranny makes the same amount of horsepower, but it does churn out less torque at 420 Nm.

A picture of the Hilux Conquest's engine

The 2021 Toyota Hilux Conquest's 2.8-liter turbo diesel powerplant

Power is sent to the rear wheels via a six-speed automatic gearbox for the Conquest 2.8 4x4 AT, and a six-speed manual gearbox for the Conquest 4x4 MT. Apart from that, only these two aforementioned top-spec variants are equipped with an auto disconnect differential, and a differential lock.

The second engine option is used by the Conquest 4x2 variants, the Hilux G and the Hilux E. It’s still an inline-4 turbo diesel, but it has a smaller displacement of 2.4-liters. At the most, it can make up to 148 horsepower and 400 Nm of torque. Depending on the variant, the said engine is paired with a six-speed automatic tranny, or a six-speed manual tranny. For all Hilux variants, power is sent to the rear wheels.

A picture of the 2nd engine option for the Toyota Hilux

The 2021 Toyota Hilux's 2.4-liter 2GD-FTV

The Hilux Conquest trim and the Hilux J are the only variants that have a 4x4 version. The rest, namely the two 2.4-liter versions of the Conquest, the Hilux G, and J, come with a 4x2 drivetrain.

Last but not the least, all Hilux variants use a double-wishbone type front suspension and a leaf-spring rigid axle rear suspension. The entire variant lineup also comes standard with ventilated discs for the front and drum-type brakes for the rear.

>>> Related: How the Toyota Hilux has changed since 1968

Toyota Hilux Variants: Safety

For safety, most of the Hilux variants come standard with dual front airbags and a driver knee airbag. The only exception is the Hilux Conquest 2.8 4x4 AT which has more in the form of side airbags and curtain shield airbags.

For visibility and parking, only the Conquest trim levels come with a reverse camera, two front parking sensors, and four rear parking sensors. The Hilux G in turn only has two rear parking sensors, while the Hilux E and the fleet variants do not have any parking sensors at all.

Moving on, all the non-fleet variants are equipped with stability control, hill start assist, anti-lock braking, an engine immobilizer, and a car alarm. If you want downhill assist control, that’s only available on the 2.8-liter 4x4 Conquest variants.

Toyota Hilux Variants: Price

Toyota Hilux Variants
Price
Hilux 2.4 Cab and Chassis
Php 843,000
Hilux Cargo 2.4 4x2 MT
Php 936,000
Hilux J 2.4 4x2 MT
Php 952,000
Hilux FX w/o Rear AC 2.4 4x2 MT
Php 1,029,000
Hilux FX w/ Rear AC 2.4 4x2 MT
Php 1,057,000
Hilux E 2.4 4x2 MT
Php 1,113,000
Hilux J 2.4 4x4 AT
Php 1,148,000
Hilux G 2.4 4x2 MT
Php 1,220,000
Hilux G 2.4 4x2 AT
Php 1,295,000
Hilux Conquest 2.4 4x2 MT
Php 1,380,000
Hilux Conquest 2.4 4x2 AT
Php 1,455,000
Hilux Conquest 2.8 4x4 MT
Php 1,755,000
Hilux Conquest 2.8 4x4 AT
Php 1,830,000

>>> Related: 2020 Ford Ranger vs Toyota Hilux Comparison: Spec Sheet Battle

The Hilux Fleet Variants

While we went over the Hilux’s differences when it comes to exterior looks and features, do note that the official Toyota Philippines website has listed several variants of the Hilux under a separate category. The most basic Hilux J as well as the cab and chassis, the cargo variant, and the FX variant are now under the “Hilux Fleet” page. That’s because these ones are mostly catered to small to large businesses looking for transportation. But yes, one can still buy a “hilux fleet variant” if one wants to.

A picture of the Toyota Hilux J

The very humble, but very capable Toyota Hilux J

For the most part, these variants are powered by the 2GD-FTV turbo diesel engine. For the Hilux J 4x4 and 4x2 MT, it can make up to 148 horsepower and 400 Nm of torque. The lower-spec engine found on the FX, Cargo, and Cab and Chassis variants make 148 horsepower and 343 Nm of torque. For the J variants, it uses a six-speed manual gearbox, while the rest uses a five-speed manual gearbox.

And lastly, only the Hilux J comes with a double cab. Like the rest of the Hilux Fleet variants however, it also rides lower than the higher Hilux trims, and it only comes with a 2-DIN headunit. These variants however, still come with a manual air-conditioning system, dual front airbags plus a driver’s knee airbag, among others.

A picture of the Hilux J's interior

The Hilux J's interior

The Hilux Fleet variants only have one color option, which is white.

>>> Related: Check out the latest Toyota Hilux promos here

Toyota Hilux Variants: Conclusion

If you need a robust and powerful logistics solution for your business, then the fleet variants, and even the Hilux E can do great. The cab and chassis can be configured to suit many different applications, and they can deal with rough terrain.

As a family vehicle though, your choices can range from the Hilux E up to the top-spec Conquest. Even the Hilux J can do that since it has a double-cab body configuration. It is, however, simpler looking compared to other Hilux variants.

A picture of the Hilux J on rough roads

Regardless of whether it's the J or the Conquest, it will do well on rough terrain

If you really care about power and off-road capability though, the only 4x4 variants available to you are the top-spec Conquest 2.8 4x4 variants and the Hilux J 4x4. Sadly, there’s no in-between as of yet. That said however, the Hilux J can be modified to have better ride height, an off-road ready suspension system, a winch mountable bumper, etc. It does however lack a locking diff.

If you’re not particular about looks but you do care about daily drivability, fuel economy, all while keeping the price down, then your best bet will be the Hilux E and G.

For more car buying guides, keep reading here on Philkotse.com.

Know more about Toyota Hilux 2021

Toyota Hilux

<p>The Toyota Hilux is a pickup with a globally known nameplate for being one of the reliable workhorse vehicles. It was 1968 when Toyota&#39;s pickup truck started building a reputation for being rugged and dependable, and it continues until today with the facelifted model launched in 2020. This popular pickup continues to evolve and slowly move upmarket after gaining luxuries. The most significant revolutionary jump of the Hilux happened in 2004 when the seventh-generation of the model was introduced. It was the first 21st-century iteration of Toyota&#39;s pickup. It is also the first generation to ride on Toyota&rsquo;s new Innovative Multi-purpose Vehicle architecture. It provided improved safety, better ride comfort, modern D-4D diesel engines, more interior space, and a more modern aerodynamic body. The current 8th generation offers a more refined and stylish design than its predecessor, but the tradition of being a tough pickup continues. It gets a much-awaited refresh in 2020 inline. Aside from improved looks, the Philippine iteration also comes with more powerful engine options. The Toyota Hilux is available in 4x4 and 4x2 variants. In the Philippines, the pickup truck is offered with diesel engines. It is available with automatic or manual transmission depending on the variant.</p>

From ₱843,000

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Cesar G.B. Miguel

Cesar G.B. Miguel

Author

Cesar is a graduate of AB English with previous experience working as a freelance writer for varied internet publications in-between his former stints in the Pharmaceutical Industry, and later as a First Aid Provider and Training Staff at the Iligan City Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office.

Since childhood, Cesar has been keenly interested in cars. He has learned the ins and outs of these marvelous vehicles and is a competent amateur mechanic who is keen on sharing his knowledge.

Cesar is perceptive of car culture in general – not only in the Philippines but in global regard, as well. His knowledge ranges from the prevalent stories and trends among car enthusiasts around the world, to closely following the latest local and international developments in the automotive industry.

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