2018 Hyundai Creta to receive all-new 1.4L T-GDI engine

Updated Sep 29, 2020 | Same topic: Most Updated Car Concept

This new engine option will be available in China.
According to Cheshi.com, a Chinese car website, the 2018 Hyundai Creta (dubbed Hyundai ix25 in the Chinese market) will be equipped with a new 1.4L T-GDI petrol engine.
 
angular front of the 2018 Hyundai Creta

The 2018 Hyundai Creta will be equipped with a new 1.4L T-GDI petrol engine

1.6L Gamma, 1.6L T-GDI and 2.0L Nu petrol engine are three options Hyundai offers its current Creta models. Xue Haozhi, Director at Beijing-Hyundai’s Communication Office has confirmed that the 2018 Hyundai Creta will get updated with an all-new 1.4 L T-GDI engine which has a quite similar output to the 2.0L engine. To be specific, the new engine will churn out 128 hp and a peak torque of 211 Nm.
 
Rear view of the 2018 Hyundai Creta

The new engine will churn out 128 hp and a peak torque of 211 Nm

>>> View more: Hyundai Creta facelift may go on sale in India by early 2018

In the meantime, other local sources reveal that the 2018 Creta will be available in new 1.4L T-GDI and 1.6L Gamma engines which gives an output of 123 hp and 150 Nm of torque. The 1.6L T-GDI and 2.0L Nu engines won’t be present in the upcoming SUV.
 
Front and side view of the 2018 Hyundai Creta

Changes in the new Creta’s exterior include courtesy new bumpers and revised front fascia

Taking a look at images on Cheshi, we can see some changes in the new Creta’s exterior including courtesy new bumpers, revised front fascia as well as other visual changes arriving with the mid-cycle refresh. Moreover, the 2018 Creta also measures a new length of 4,290 mm, 20 mm longer than the outgoing models.

Xue Haozhi says that the 2018 Hyundai Creta facelift will premiere during this year. Latest updates on upcoming Hyundai cars can be found in our Complete guide to the Hyundai Philippines' local lineup.
 


2018 Hyundai Creta Redesign

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Younger fans might not be aware of it, but the Korean wave or hallyu predates the slick choreography of K-pop groups and the hearty servings of samgyupsal. It’s actually rooted in the writings of Kim Gu, who led the movement to set Korea free from Japanese occupation during the 1920s.

Kim wanted Korea to be a power in its own right, but not in terms of political or military might. He was aware of the suffering his people endured when Japan annexed the country, and so he harbored the idea that Korean culture can be used as a soft power to shape global perception through attraction, not coercion.

HARI has proudly carried the Hyundai brand in the Philippines for 20 years